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are in custody in benghazi. they're being indirectly linked to the rocket attack on the u.s. consulate. i want to talk to jimana in tripoli, the libyan capital west of benghazi. first of all, what do we know about those arrested? >> very little, suzanne, so far. what we understand from libyan officials is that at least one of those arrested is a -- they were detained in benghazi yesterday. we know they are being interrogated to see what role they had in the attack, but according to one sore libyan official today, they may not have been directly linked to the attack. they may have ties to the extremist organization that carried out the attack. they have not been charged yet. they are detained and being intrargted acorked to libyan officials, so we should be knowing about this as information is released by the libyan government. >> do we believe these people are really responsible for what took place, or does this look like this is more kind of a show? >> well, quite frankly, suzanne, the libyan government here is under a lot of pressure when it comes to this. not only from the united states, bu
in the muslim world. >>> and new developments in the benghazi lib attack. four people now under arrest, all four victims now identified. good morning. welcome to "early start," i'm christine romans. >> and i'm brianna keilar. zoraida zam lynn and john berman are off. it's 5:00 in the east so let's get started. >>> protests erupting overnight and with friday prayers ending in just one hour u.s. embassies around the world are bracing for more. overnight, the anger and defiance that started wednesday over an anti-muslim movie made in the u.s. spreading to 11 countries from egypt to as far west as morocco and as far east as india. the worst of it in yemen, where at least five yemenis were killed as hundreds of protesters stormed the american embassy in sanaa. cars and bottles smashed, water cannons brought out to control this crowd. in egypt, where the violence first erupted three days ago, more clashes. protesters setting fires and the egyptian military deploying tanks to keep things calm. and in libya news overnight that four people arrested in the murder of ambassador ch
.s. personnel have been evacuated from benghazi, libya. and very small skeletal staffs in tripoli and also yemen. but the u.s. is also looking at other countries. we have ten countries that you just mentioned where there are u.s. protests. clearly they're looking at sudan right now. right now they're not evacuating people. again, they're saying stay tuned. make sure you're registered with the embassy. right now everyone's relying on commercial travel to get out. the roads are open. everything's open, wolf. right now it's just seems to be localized just at these u.s. embassies and not kind of chaos spreading throughout the country. >> these are live pictures we're showing our viewers now from tahrir square in cairo. not very far from the u.s. embassy. you've been there, i've been there. it's only a few -- maybe a block away. but they have apparently established all sorts of barriers around the u.s. embassy. it's a huge embassy too. >> it's a huge embassy. it's like a complex, if you will. even as you have the setback in these reinforcements, they're asking the local government in the last couple
investigators still have not set foot in the ruins of the american consulate in benghazi, libya, tonight we're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a
in the ruins of the american consulate of benghazi, libya. tonight, we're the first it tell you why. the likely reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not. today the director of national intelligence, james clapper, explained early evidence supported that theory, so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter
to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection, in other words, but that request was not granted. fran's a former white house homeland security advisor. she served in the george w. bush administration, currently she sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews and forbes. also joining us, former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes, who has extensive experience investigating attacks on americans overseas, and former cia officer, bob baer. so fran, so the fbi sought military protection to go into benghazi. why didn't they get it? >> well, the answer to that question, i think, is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to provide it, we don't know what the answer to that is, y may ask if you think you need it for u.s. military support, but that's got to go through a process. it needs state department and nsc support, the u.s. military would have to make an assessment about how big a security package that would entail a
happened yesterday in the city of benghazi. a libyan security official told nbc news that the u.s. ambassador, chris stevens, was killed when a mob, an armed mob attacked the consulate in benghazi yesterday. first they attacked the consulate with rpgs and then automatic rifles and then set the building on fire. this official says that the u.s. ambassador was holed up in some sort of room and apparently died of smoke inhalation. the u.s. state department has not officially confirmed his death, only saying that a u.s. official has been killed. >> and richard, do we know anything about the identity of the three others that were killed in that attack as well? are they americans, military personnel? >> reporter: we don't know. we know -- we've been told that the u.s. ambassador's body and three other bodies have been taken to the benghazi airport. there are some reports that at least one, perhaps all of them, may have been u.s. marines, but we have not been able to confirm that. our source is only saying that it was the ambassador. three other bodies and that the libyan president and
in that attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, stevens was worried about what he described as the never ending security threats in that city. also the u.s. counterterrorism chief is now calling that assault that killed stevens and three of his american colleagues a terrorist attack. and there are reports that a former detainee at guantanamo bay who was released and returned to libya may have, in fact, been the ringleader of benghazi attack. cnn has not yet been able to independently confirm that latter report. but our cnn national security contributor fred townsend joins us live. she's a member of the cia external advisory committee. she was also a personal friend of ambassador stevens and had visited libya with her employer. are your sources saying anything about this report, a series of reports that, in fact, it may have been a former gitmo prisoner that was released in amnesty, went back to libya and orchestrated these murders? >> the individual that we're talking about is a well-known sort of al qaeda bad guy. he was taken in custody and served time at guantanamo. he was released to the li
generally, not about the attack in benghazi. now, u.s. intelligence sources tell cnn tonight that in the immediate after math of the attack, they thought the attack might have been, their word, spontaneous. okay, this is going to be a crucial word to define. what exactly is immediate aftermath? because the white house and the state department stuck with the spontaneous version of events for eight days. >> we are very cautious about drawing any conclusions with regard to who the perpetrators were, what their motivations were, whether it was premedicated. >> this was not a preplanned, premeditated attack. >> based on the information we had at the time and have to this day, we we do not have evidence that it was premeditated. >> all right. these same people apparently knew a terrorist attack was perpetrated by al-qaeda within 24 hours after the attack, so the lack of information sharing does not seem to add up. tonight, representative peter king is calling for the resignation of u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice for what he says was misleading comments about the attacks in
not secret. when ambassador stevens was moving from tripoli to benghazi, he was doing public events. his schedule was known ahead of time. so i have a perhaps a different perspective because in libya right now, there are militias that are both internal and external. the whole eastern part of libya right now is under the control of islamic extremists, east of benghazi. there are towns where the government has not control where extremists have gained a foothold and there's no way of knowing whether they're domestic or foreign. >> eliot: even though there has been a democratic process in libya, there is a government which we obviously recognize and have somewhat cordial relationships with, the actual capacity of the government to control the way we think of government control and territory is limited especially as you say in the eastern part. >> there are consistent attacks that have been undertaken in libya against the government by elements of rem nines of a gadhafi regime, islamic extremists. there have been power outa
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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